Guidance for Applicants

//Guidance for Applicants
Guidance for Applicants2019-03-07T09:08:33-05:00

Guidance for Applicants

The Prioritization Process is a competitive application process that is used to allocate OKI federal surface transportation block grant funds in Ohio and Kentucky. As part of the process, a workshop will be held for potential applicants where OKI staff provides background and is available to answer specific questions about procedures.

The Application Form is to be filled out by the applicant. Supplemental information/attachments may be included at the end of the application if absolutely necessary. They should be as condensed as possible. Incomplete applications may be rejected.

The Project Scoring Process is the method under which the Prioritization Subcommittee reviews and ranks the individual applications. A detailed explanation of the revised scoring process follows. An application is first scored using Transportation Factors (highway, transit, non-highway freight factors, or bike/ped) depending on the type of project. Transportation factors take into account a variety of measures related to performance and condition and are mode-specific. A subtotal of 45 points is available. All projects are then scored on Planning Factors, which are non-mode specific and are standard elements against which all projects regardless of mode are scored. A subtotal of 60 points is available with the planning factors. The overall total score is the sum of the Transportation and Planning factors.

Transportation Factors for Roadway Projects (45 points)

1. (5) The Safety factor measures the existing accident rate per hundred million vehicle miles (HMVM) for the project area. Points are awarded based upon crashes per hundred million vehicle miles (HMVM) ranging from more than 100 crashes per HMVM to more than 1000 crashes per HMVM. Projects areas with less than 100 per HMVM do not score any points on this factor.

2. (5) Impact on Safety assesses the impact the proposal will have on the existing situation, ranging from 0 to 5 points depending on the estimated crash reduction factor and improvement type (see appendix A).

3. (5) The Average Daily Traffic (ADT) measures the current traffic volumes in the project area. Volumes from less than 5,000 vehicles per day (VPD) to 40,000 VPD equate to a scoring range of 0 to 5 points. A current ADT should be provided by the applicant. If the project involves numerous roadway segments, an average may be used and documented.

4. (5) Travel Time Index (TTI) is used to compare peak period travel speed to a free-flow travel speed. TTI includes both recurring and incident conditions and is, therefore, an estimate of the conditions faced by travelers. It is calculated by dividing free-flow travel speed by peak period observed travel speed.

For example, a roadway segment with a free-flow speed of 60 mph where the observed peak period travel speed is 48 mph would have a TTI value of 1.25. When peak period travel speed is greater than free-flow speed, TTI is recorded as 0.00, or no congestion. Refer to http://www.oki.org/portfolio-items/project-application-assistant/. For links without a TTI staff will assist the applicant.

Current Congestion Level Peak Hour TTI Range Score
High >= 2.0 5 points
Moderate >= 1.2 to <2.0 3 points
Low <1.2 0 points

5. (5) Impact on Travel Time provides points based on how the proposal alleviates the current level of congestion. A high impact score cannot be awarded to a project that does not document an existing problem. Applicants should provide an analysis or explanation documenting how they arrived at the anticipated congestion.

6. (5) The Freight Volumes factor provides points for corridors with a high volume of truck traffic. This figure is based upon the percentage of truck traffic within the project area. The point scale was revised in 2018 to more evenly reflect the observed distribution of truck percentages on regional roadways.

7. (5) The Existing Conditions factor will award up to 5 points based on the roadway pavement condition or bridge sufficiency rating.

Pavement condition is measured by the International Roughness Index (IRI), a standardized pavement measurement indicating the overall smoothness of a roadway. Please refer to http://maps.oki.org/pavementcondition/. Bridge condition is measured by the sufficiency rating. Please refer to http://maps.oki.org/bridgesbeta/

Pavement Conditions

IRI Range Score
Greater than 170 5 points
95-170 3 points
Less than 95 0 points

Bridge Condition

Sufficiency Rating Score
Less than 30 5 points
30-50 4 points
50-80 3 points
Greater than 80 0 points

8. (5) The Complete Streets factor will award up to 5 points. A complete street is a public thoroughfare that accommodates all modes of travel. Projects that advance the concept of complete streets will be judged by the number of modes accommodated after completion of the project. Eligible modes include motor vehicles, transit, bicycles and pedestrians. In addition a point can be earned for traffic calming related safety improvements (See the “terminology” section below).

As stated, the complete street section points are awarded for the number of modes accommodated after completion of the project. For example, improvement of a street that already has sidewalks gets a point for sidewalks even though they were not added as part of the project and a point for the roadway improvement. A project that adds facilities for bicycling and walking to existing streets scores a point for each facility because each is part of the total number of modes accommodated.  A project on a street that is used for fixed-route public transit service is awarded a point even though it is not part of the project. Project design should conform to available guidelines – AASHTO, FHWA, ADA, ITE and others.

Terminology:

Motor vehicles: cars, trucks

Fixed transit route: scheduled fixed route transit service uses this road (not determined by the project).

Pedestrian facilities: provisions for sidewalks of appropriate design, normally 5 ft concrete pavement (wider for commercial areas) and a planting/utility strip.

Bicycle facilities: May be striped bike lanes, shared lane markings (sharrows) wide curb lanes or sidepaths (shared or multi-use paths within a street’s right-of-way), according to local public input, or shoulders on rural roads.

Transit: facilities that complement existing transit service such as pull outs, paved waiting areas, shelters, bike parking and transit centers.

Traffic Calming: a variety of treatments intended to slow vehicle traffic such as sidewalk curb extensions, reduced turn radii, roundabouts, pedestrian refuge islands.

9. (5) The Status of Project factor awards points based on the existing status of the project. The closer the project is to the construction phase, the more points it will receive. If the project is seeking initial funds for construction and right-of-way phases (no work completed), the project will receive 2 points. If right-of-way and/or construction plans are complete, the project is ready to begin and will be awarded 5 points. In Ohio, utilities, ROW and construction phases are eligible for funding; in Kentucky, design, utilities, ROW and construction phases are all eligible for funding; in Indiana, PE, ROW and construction phases are eligible for funding.

 

Factor: Safety

Measure Points
More than 1000 crashes per HMVM 5
750 to 1000 crashes per HMVM 4
500 to 750 crashes per HMVM 3
250 to 500 crashes per HMVM 2
100 to 250 crashes per HMVM 1
Less than 100 crashes per HMVM 0

Factor: Impact on Safety

Measure Points
Points range from
based on the crash reduction factor (see Appendix A)
0 to 5

Factor: Average Daily Traffic (ADT)

Measure Points
Over 40,000 5
Over 30,000 4
Over 20,000 3
Over 10,000 2
Over 5,000 1
Less than 5,000 0

Factor: Travel Time Index

Measure Points
Greater than 2.0 5
1.2 and 2.0 3
Less than 1.2 0

Factor: Impact on Travel Time

Measure Points
High Impact 5
Medium Impact 3
Low Impact 1
No Impact 0

Factor: Freight Volumes (Truck Traffic Percentages)

Measure Points
12% or Greater 5
8 to < 12% 4
5 to < 8% 3
3 to < 5% 2
1 to < 3% 1
<1% 0

Factor: Existing Conditions

Measure Points
Greater than 170 5
95-170 3
Less than 95 0

Factor: Bridge Condition (Sufficiency Rating)

Measure Points
Less than 30 5
30-50 4
50-80 3
Greater than 80 0

Factor: Complete Streets : Score one point for each viable mode in the finished project (up to 5 points)

Measure Points
Motor vehicle 1
Fixed transit route 1
Pedestrian facility 1
Bicycling facility 1
Traffic calming 1

Factor: Status of Project

Measure Points
Construction and/or ROW plans complete 5
P/E and Environmental complete 4
Initial request for construction funding only 3
Initial request for construction and ROW funding 2
Initial request for CON, ROW, and PE/Design (KY, IN) 1

 

Transportation Factors for Transit Projects (45 points)

10. (5) The Type factor awards points based on the type of project requesting funding. Revenue vehicles, for example, scores the highest points (5) and demonstrates the objective of improving the operating efficiency of the existing infrastructure listed in the OKI Regional Transportation Plan. Fixed guideways, Park and Ride lots and Transit Centers will score up to 4 points. Support, non-revenue equipment (maintenance facilities, standard fare collection equipment, etc. will be scored up to 3 points.

11. (10) Ridership Impact factor awards points for a project’s ability to maintain or increase ridership. A high increase in ridership will be awarded 10 points, a medium increase 6 points, a low increase 2 points and no increase in ridership 0 points.

12. (10) Impact on Safety and Security factor awards points for the impact the project will have on safety and security. For example, a new bus or rail transit vehicle may be equipped with video and audio equipment to increase security. In addition, the new bus or rail transit vehicle may have additional safety features not found on the vehicle it is replacing. A high impact will result in 10 points.

13. (5) Time to Implementation reflects the importance of being able to implement a project in a timely fashion. Projects that can be implemented within one year will be awarded 5 points.

14. (5) System Impact is another important factor in reviewing transit applications. Up to 5 points will be awarded with this criterion. A new bus garage, for example, would favorably impact the system, but would not affect passengers. A replacement bus would favorably impact the passengers, but not necessarily the system. An impact to the system will generate 1 point; an impact to passengers only will generate 3 points. A new transit hub, however, would favorably impact both the system and the passengers and would result in 5 points.

15. (10) Existing Asset Physical Condition for a transit element is a subjective measure provided by the transit professional and will be scored up to 10 points for an asset in poor condition. This element was combined with the previous element Capital Utilization. The FTA guidelines will be used as a reference. For example, a large transit coach generally has a useful life of 12 years and 500,000 miles. Projects that exceed the useful life and in poor condition will score high in this category. New projects, such as a new park-and-ride or new coaches for expansion of service, will not receive any points under this criterion. FTA software TERM Life may be used as a reference. https://www.transit.dot.gov/sites/fta.dot.gov/files/TERM-Lite_v2.3_Quick_Start_Guide.pdf

Factor: Type

Measure Points
 Replacement or expansion of revenue vehicles 5
Fixed facility 4
Support (Non-revenue) equipment 3

Factor: Ridership Impact

Measure Points
High increase in ridership 10
Medium increase in ridership 6
Low increase in ridership 2
No increase in ridership 0

Factor: Impact on Safety & Security

Measure Points
High impact 10
Medium impact 6
Low impact 2
No impact 0

Factor: Time to Implementation

Measure Points
0 to <1 year 5
1 to 2 years 3
3 to 4 years 0

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Factor: System Impact

Measure Points
Impact on system and passenger 5
Impact on passengers only 3
Impact on system only 1

Factor: Existing Asset Physical Conditions

Measure Points
Poor 10
Fair 6
Good 0

 

Transportation Factors for Bike and Pedestrian Projects (45 points)

16. (5) Safety is an important consideration in project selection process. The annual average number of crashes in the project area over a five year period involving bike or pedestrians is used as the metric for assigning up to 5 points.

17. (5) Impact on Safety assesses the impact the proposal will have on the existing situation, ranging from 0 to 5 points.

18. (10) The OKI process seeks to give priority to regional connections. The Network Connections element awards up to 10 points for regional network components to 2 points for non-network components.

19. (10) Feasibility is a subjective measure indicative of the ability to implement the project considering a range of factors that could include such things as constructability, right of way, public support, unusual cost, environmental or other circumstances.

20. (5) The Existing Surface Conditions factor awards points for the physical conditions of the pathway, sidewalk, etc. Poor conditions can be scored up to 5 points. New facility or those in good condition will receive 0 points.

21. (5) The Complete Streets factor will award up to 5 points. A complete street is a public thoroughfare that accommodates all modes of travel. Projects that advance the concept of complete streets will be judged by the number of modes accommodated after completion of the project. Eligible modes include motor vehicles, transit, bicycles and pedestrians. In addition a point can be earned for traffic calming related safety improvements (See the “terminology” section below).

As stated, the complete street section points are awarded for the number of modes accommodated after completion of the project. For example, improvement of a street that already has sidewalks gets a point for sidewalks even though they were not added as part of the project and a point for the roadway improvement. A project that adds facilities for bicycling and walking to existing streets scores a point for each facility because each is part of the total number of modes accommodated.  A project on a street that is used for fixed-route public transit service is awarded a point even though it is not part of the project. Project design should conform to available guidelines – AASHTO, FHWA, ADA, ITE and others.

Terminology:

Motor vehicles: cars, trucks

Fixed transit route: scheduled fixed route transit service uses this road (not determined by the project).

Pedestrian facilities: provisions for sidewalks of appropriate design, normally 5 ft concrete pavement (wider for commercial areas) and a planting/utility strip.

Bicycle facilities: May be striped bike lanes, shared lane markings (sharrows) wide curb lanes or sidepaths (shared or multi-use paths within a street’s right-of-way), according to local public input, or shoulders on rural roads.

Transit: facilities that complement existing transit service such as pull outs, paved waiting areas, shelters, bike parking and transit centers.

Traffic Calming: a variety of treatments intended to slow vehicle traffic such as sidewalk curb extensions, reduced turn radii, roundabouts, pedestrian refuge islands.

22. (5) The Status of Project factor awards points for the existing status of the project. The closer the project is to the construction phase, the more points it will receive. If the project is seeking initial funds for construction and right-of-way phases (no work completed), the project will receive 2 points. If right-of-way and/or construction plans are complete, the project is ready to begin and will be awarded 5 points. In Ohio, ROW and construction phases are eligible for funding; in Kentucky, design, utilities, ROW and construction phases are all eligible for funding; in Indiana, PE, ROW and construction phases are eligible for funding.

Factor: Safety (# of Bike/Ped Crashes in Project Area)

Measure Points
Annual average crashes over 5 year period-Greater than 5 5
3 – 5 3
1 – 3 1
None 0

Factor: Impact on Safety

Measure Points
High impact 5
Medium impact 3
Low impact 1
No impact 0

Factor: Network Connections

Measure Points
Regional network component 10
Connection to regional network 6
Local network component 4
Non-network component 2

Factor: Feasibility

Measure Points
High 10
Moderate 5
Marginal 3
Not Feasible 0

Factor: Existing Surface Conditions

Measure Points
Poor 5
Fair 3
Good/New Facility 0

Factor: Complete Streets: Score 1 point for each viable mode (up to 5 points)

Measure Points
Motor vehicle 1
Fixed transit route 1
Pedestrian facility 1
Bicycling facility 1
Traffic calming 1

Factor: Status of Project

Measure Points
Construction and/or ROW plans complete 5
P/E and Environmental complete 4
Initial request for construction funding only 3
Initial request for construction or ROW funding 2
Initial request for CON, ROW & PE Design (KY) 1

 

Transportation Factors for Non Roadway Freight Projects (45 points)

23. (5) The Mode Specific Traffic Flow factor awards points based on volume to capacity ratios in the project area. Projects greater than a 1.0 ratio indicate a high level of congestion and will receive up to 5 points.

24. (20) The Impact on Roadway Congestion factor provides points based on the extent to which large trucks will be removed from roadways in the OKI region, thereby alleviating the current level of congestion. A high reduction in trucks cannot be awarded to a project that does not document an existing congestion problem. Applicants should provide an analysis documenting how they arrived at their anticipated truck reduction value. Consideration will be given to identification of primary or representative roadway facilities impacted, their current peak period capacity and congestion levels and the effect of large trucks equivalent reductions to impacted roadways.

25. (5) The Safety factor awards points to projects that can be linked to improving safety conditions in the project area. The existing safety problem must be documented along with a plan to address these problems.

26. (5) The Status of Project factor awards points for the existing status of the project. If right-of-way and/or construction plans are complete, the project is ready to begin and will be awarded 5 points. The project will receive fewer points based on additional steps that are needed prior to construction.

27. (5) The Reliability factor awards points to projects that can demonstrate that they will result in an improvement to on-time deliveries. The existing on-time delivery problem must be documented with an explanation of how the project will improve reliability of freight arrivals and/or departures. Up to 5 points are available.

28. (5) The Existing Asset Physical Condition factor awards points to projects based on demonstrated need from its physical condition perspective. Facilities in poor physical condition will be awarded up to 5 points. Facilities in fair condition will be awarded 3 points and those in good condition will be awarded zero. Applicants should provide industry accepted standards for the basis for their evaluation.

Factor: Mode Specific Traffic Flow

Measure Points
Mode V/C > 1.0 5
Mode V/C .75 to < 1.0 4
Mode V/C .50 to < .75 3
Mode V/C .25 to < .50 2
Mode V/C < .25 0

Factor: Impact on Roadway Congestion

Measure Points
High number of large trucks removed/day 20
Medium number of large trucks removed/day 10
Low number of large trucks removed/day 5
No trucks removed/day 0

Factor: Safety

Measure Points
High positive impact 5
Medium positive impact 3
Low positive impact 1
No impact 0

Factor: Status of Project

Measure Points
Construction and/or ROW plans complete 5
P/E and Environmental complete 3
Initial request for construction and/or ROW funds 1
No plans completed 0

Factor: Reliability

Measure Points
High positive impact 5
Medium positive impact 3
Low positive impact 1
No impact 0

Factor: Existing Asset Physical Conditions

Measure Points
Poor 5
Fair 3
Good 0

 

Planning Factors for All Projects (60 points)

29. (5) The Environmental Justice factor awards points to projects that will have an overall net benefit to minority and low-income population groups per Executive Order 12898 issued by President Clinton in February 1994.  The basis for Environmental Justice is Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.  The OKI Environmental Justice Advisory Committee, which reviews project applications for funding and awards points for this factor, also examines a project’s impact on zero-car households, elderly persons and persons with disabilities. The overall net benefit in the scoring indicates a subjective consideration of both POSITIVE and NEGATIVE impacts.  It is understood that when federal funds are involved there are federal guidelines that must be met to ensure that services and benefits are fairly distributed to all people, regardless of race, national origin or income, and that they have access to meaningful participation.  Refer to Title 42 of the United States Code.  A response to this section is required in order for the project to be funded even if the project is not located within one of the designated Environmental Justice (EJ) communities.

30. (5) Economic Vitality: Existing Employment within ½ mile: The link between transportation and the benefits of commerce is well established. Applications will be scored from 0 to 5 points based on the number of existing jobs within ½ mile of the project area. OKI staff will perform the scoring of this element.

31. (5) Economic Vitality: Investment Bonus / Employment Bonus: Applicants will also have the opportunity to earn up to 5 bonus points for documented job creation and/or real or capital investment within the transportation project area. The applicant will provide clear evidence of the relationship between the proposed transportation project and the (permanent) jobs and/or investment criteria to earn the bonus points. Jobs related to the construction itself is not included in the number of jobs created.

32. (5) The Air Quality/Energy factor relates to continued efforts to improve the regional air quality and encourage investment in more environmentally friendly forms of fuel use. A reduction in VMT (vehicle miles of travel), VHT (vehicle hours of travel), or Emissions Reduced can be combined to receive a score of up to 5 points. If two of the three items are reduced, 4 or 5 points will be awarded. If only one item is reduced, 1 to 3 points will be awarded. If a project has no or negligible impact a score of zero is awarded. Examples of these measures include the use of diesel engine pollution control devices (emissions reduced), intersection signal improvements (VHT reduced), construction of a new roadway link reducing circuitous travel (VMT reduced), or a new compressed natural gas bus on a new route (all three).

33. (5) The Intermodal Connections factor awards up to 5 points for projects that involve new and direct connections between modes. Examples of this are such things as new connections between barge and rail facilities, new access to a port,  park and ride facilities, or a new sidewalk to a bust stop.

34. (5) The Replacement/Expansion factor gives preference to projects that invest in replacement rather than new facilities, reflecting the expressed priority in OKI’s long range plan to maintain what currently exists before investing in new infrastructure. The points associated with this criterion take into account that some expansion projects involve a certain amount of replacement; the points for this criterion are awarded based on percentage of replacement versus percentage of expansion associated with the project.

35. (5) The Strategic Regional Policy Plan (SRPP) Implementation factor examines the ability of the project to help implement the policies of OKI’s Strategic Regional Policy Plan. The policies within the SRPP were envisioned by the Land Use Commission to be implemented concurrently by OKI, local governments and other organizations. Implementation of these policies will help bring about more consistency between local land use planning and regional transportation planning to create a more efficient and more accessible regional transportation network that serves the needs of individual communities.

36. (5) The Local Planning factor awards up to 5 points and examines the degree to which a project helps to implement the Strategic Regional Policy Plan (SRPP) through effective local comprehensive planning. A central objective of OKI’s SRPP is for each local government to have an up-to-date comprehensive plan that links transportation, land use, economic development, public facilities, housing, natural resources, recreation, intergovernmental coordination and capital improvements. The SRPP emphasizes complete and current local government comprehensive plans as a means to a more efficient multi-modal regional transportation system. The SRPP responds to the Land Use Commission’s mission to bring more consistency between regional transportation planning and local land use planning. Since not all communities have complete and up-to-date comprehensive plans, OKI will again consider and award up to 5 points to proposed transportation projects that are consistent with a comprehensive plan or other discrete studies or plans such as thoroughfare plans, corridor studies, small area plans or other planning documents if the applicant can demonstrate that the plan meets similar analysis and content criteria.

37. (10) The Local Share factor rewards applicants that increase their local share to “overmatch” the required rate for local participation. The standard match rate for OKI-allocated funds is 20 percent; however, the applicant can gain up to a maximum of 10 points through overmatching.

38. (0) The Applicant’s History of Project Delivery takes into account whether an applicant has had projects slip from one fiscal year to a later year after the project has been programmed. While external factors can affect the delivery of a project, it is important for OKI to maintain a balanced budget of projects to be delivered each fiscal year. The potential for slippage needs to be addressed when a project is initially programmed. Based on projects programmed in the active TIP at the time of application, an applicant who has had one project slip to a later year will be penalized -3 points; an applicant who has had two or more projects slip to a later year will be penalized -5 points; an applicant who has had one or more projects cancelled will be penalized -10 points.

39. (10) Technology – This element is added in 2018 to prepare for and encourage the implementation of new technologies, automation, advanced materials, etc. in transportation. The applicant will be required to explicitly state the component(s) of their project that justify award of points.

Roadway Score
Equipment or technologies to advance adoption of connected vehicles, may include DSRC devices, fiber optic, etc.

10

Equipment or technologies that optimize existing traffic operations/capacity/travel times without the need for additional right-of-way. May include active traffic demand management such as hard shoulder running, variable speed limits, bus on shoulder, ramp metering, etc.

10

Equipment or technologies to advance adoption of autonomous vehicles, may include dedicated short range communication devices

7

Traffic Signal Upgrade/Optimization. (Does not include physical upgrade to LED)

7

Complete mobility applications (software + hardware) that lead to improved and efficient, traveling, parking or data collection

7

High performance structural roadway building materials leading to significant roadway lifecycle cost savings

5

Transit Score
Equipment or technologies to advance adoption of connected transit vehicles, may include DSRC devices.

10

Equipment or technologies that optimize existing transit operations/capacity/schedule adherence. May include microtransit solutions for first and last mile

10

Equipment or technologies to advance adoption of autonomous transit vehicles, may include dedicated short range communication devices

7

Equipment or technologies that create seamless connectivity for travelers using multiple transit agencies, ridesharing and/or other travel modes/services

7

Real time bus arrival/departure notification systems (Customer focused (“smart”) signage at bus stops/stations/hubs/park and rides, mobile applications, etc.)

7

Signal Preemption devices and technologies

7

Off-board fare payment technologies

5

Automated passenger counters

5

Bike/Ped Score
Equipment or technologies that reduce reliance on motorized travel or enhance public accessibility and usage (i.e. bike-sharing facilities, services, mobile applications (Apps), payment systems (cash and credit card). May also include pedestrian crossing technology or data collection improvements such as permanent count stations

5- 10

High performance building materials  leading to significant facilities lifecycle cost savings and/or other public benefits related to emissions, noise, etc.

5

Non-Roadway Freight Score
Equipment or technologies to advance adoption of connected vehicles, may include DSRC devices

10

Equipment or technologies that optimize existing traffic operations without the need for additional right-of-way

10

Equipment or technologies to advance adoption of autonomous vehicles, automated or high efficiency freight and commodity delivery systems. May include dedicated short range communication devices.

10

High performance building materials  leading to significant facilities lifecycle cost savings and/or other public benefits related to emissions, noise, etc.

5

DSRC – dedicated short range communication devices
Devices must be consistent with IEEE connected and smart technologies standards
Transit applicants are required to produce the General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS) data.

Factors for Other Projects

In some cases, OKI will receive applications for projects that do not fit the highway, transit, bike/ped or non-freight highway project definition. In these cases, the Prioritization Subcommittee will examine each application and subjectively rank the application in comparison to the highway, transit, bike/ped and non-highway freight applications received. This ranking will be accomplished through a thorough review and discussion of the application and comparison of the estimated benefits to the region with the estimated cost of the project.

Factor: Environmental Justice

Measure Points
Overall net benefits (good to excellent) 4-5
Overall net benefits (fair to good) 2-3
Overall net benefits (none to fair) 0-1

Note: NET benefit for Environmental Justice indicates a subjective consideration of both POSITIVE and NEGATIVE impacts.

Factor: Economic Vitality | Existing Employment1

Measure Points
Existing employment within ½ mile of project 5000+ 5
Existing employment within ½ mile of project 2500 to 4999 4
Existing employment within ½ mile of project 1000 to 2499 3
Existing employment within ½ mile of project 750 to 999 2
Existing employment within ½ mile of project 500 to 749 1
Existing employment within ½ mile of project 0 to 499 0

Factor: Economic Vitality |Investment Bonus2

Measure Points
New Investment in the project area more than $20M 5
New Investment in the project area $15M to $20M 4
New Investment in the project area $10M to$15M 3
New Investment in the project area $5M to $10M 2
New Investment in the project area $1M to $5M 1
New Investment in the project area less than $1M 0

Factor: Economic Vitality |Employment Bonus3

Measure Points
New employment within ½ mile of project 200+ 5
New employment within ½ mile of project 100 to 200 4
New employment within ½ mile of project 75 to 100 3
New employment within ½ mile of project 50 to 75 2
New employment within ½ mile of project 25 to 50 1
New employment within ½ mile of project 0 to 25 0

Factor: Air Quality/Energy (VMT,VHT,Emissions)

Measure Points
2 or more Reduced 3 to 5
1 or more Reduced 0 to 3

Factor: Intermodal Connections

Measure Points
New interactions and/or connections of 3 or more modes 5
New interactions and/or connections of 2 or more modes 3
No new interactions or connections between modes 0

Factor: Replacement/Expansion

Measure Points
100% Replacement 5
75% Replacement/25% Expansion 4
50% Replacement/50% Expansion 3
25% Replacement/75% Expansion 2
100% Expansion 1

Factor: SRPP Local Planning – Based on answers, up to 5 points

Measure Points
Consistent–comprehensive plan complete & current 5
Consistent–comprehensive plan needs improvement 3
Inconsistent–no comprehensive plan 0

Factor: Local Share

Measure Points
50% or above of estimate 10
45% to 49% of estimate 8
40% to 44% of estimate 6
35% to 39% of estimate 4
30% to 34% of estimate 2
20% of project estimate (Required local amount) 0

Factor: History of Project Delivery

Measure Points
1 project sale slipped past programmed year -3
2 or more projects slipped past programmed year -5
project canceled -10

Factor: Local Share

Measure Points
Very High Impact 10
High Impact 7
Moderate Impact 5
Low Impact 3

  1. OKI staff can assist or provide this figure using GIS applications.
  2. Applicant must provide evidence from a study using generally accepted principals of economic analysis. Higher significance will be placed on the percentage of employment with earnings above the state median income.